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Why keep such a uniquely rejuvenating and relaxing experience all to yourself? Indulge a friend, loved one or family with a visit to the Glacier Hot Pools and perhaps a divine massage

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Kā Roimata o hinehukatere

Ngāi Tahu are an indigenous Māori tribe.

Our takiwā (territory) covers the majority of Te Waipounamu (The South Island). Te Waipounamu means the ‘Greenstone Waters’, named for its precious natural resource, the pounamu (Greenstone).

Ngāi Tahu were attracted to Te Tai Poutini (West Coast) by its bountiful sources of food and the pounamu. Te Tai Poutini means ‘The Tides of Poutini’, named after the mythical sea guardian of the pounamu.

In Ngāi Tahu traditions the Franz Josef Glacier is known as Kā Roimata o Hinehukatere – The Frozen Tears of Hinehukatere. Long ago there was a woman named Hinehukatere who spent much of her time adventuring in the mountains. Her sweetheart, Wawe, was not as swift of foot and constantly struggled to keep up with her. Whilst trekking near where the head of the glacier is today, Wawe lost his footing and fell to his death. Hinehukatere was so overcome with grief and her tears so excessive that the atua (gods) froze her tears as a perpetual memorial of her aroha (love), the frozen tears of Hinehukatere – Kā Roimata o Hinehukatere.

Ngāi Tahu have a deep ancestral connection to the local lands, waters and environment. Long ago we rested in natural hot springs after crossing our trails in search of food and pounamu. The pounamu always drawn visitors to the region and we have long held a strong tradition of manaakitanga (hospitality), including looking after and guiding the first European explorers around our rugged local environment.

Kā Roimata o hinehukatere

Ngāi Tahu are an indigenous Māori tribe.

Our takiwā (territory) covers the majority of Te Waipounamu (The South Island). Te Waipounamu means the ‘Greenstone Waters’, named for its precious natural resource, the pounamu (Greenstone).

Ngāi Tahu were attracted to Te Tai Poutini (West Coast) by its bountiful sources of food and the pounamu. Te Tai Poutini means ‘The Tides of Poutini’, named after the mythical sea guardian of the pounamu.

In Ngāi Tahu traditions the Franz Josef Glacier is known as Kā Roimata o Hinehukatere – The Frozen Tears of Hinehukatere. Long ago there was a woman named Hinehukatere who spent much of her time adventuring in the mountains. Her sweetheart, Wawe, was not as swift of foot and constantly struggled to keep up with her. Whilst trekking near where the head of the glacier is today, Wawe lost his footing and fell to his death. Hinehukatere was so overcome with grief and her tears so excessive that the atua (gods) froze her tears as a perpetual memorial of her aroha (love), the frozen tears of Hinehukatere – Kā Roimata o Hinehukatere.

Ngāi Tahu have a deep ancestral connection to the local lands, waters and environment. Long ago we rested in natural hot springs after crossing our trails in search of food and pounamu. The pounamu always drawn visitors to the region and we have long held a strong tradition of manaakitanga (hospitality), including looking after and guiding the first European explorers around our rugged local environment.